Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Yankee stadium was in its last year and the MLB decided to honor the house that Ruth built. So they threw one last All-Star game there. For Nike NY and Nike Baseball that was a big opportunity for them. They had tons of Yankees on their roster, and tons of Mets too. It was a veritable advertising subway series. And me, well, baseball isn't my sport, but I am a certified card-carrying New Yorker, and I love the shit out of this town. It was the shot I was looking for. They stuck me with some kid from Minnesota, this guy Luke. We were the greenest creatives in the agency, and we weren't supposed to get the campaign. But we did. 

For me, it was a long time coming, and for Luke, the city represented all kinds of promise. For us It was a love letter to NY. We strung together a campaign of entirely found images, including flickr shots, which at the time was unheard of. We took the roots of baseball and the nature of the city and we made something that people cared about. The campaign went everywhere. The papers, the subway, wildpostings, even Nike's 34th st. billboard.

I'll always remember this campaign fondly. Because we shouldn't have gotten it, but we did, and we took it someplace. When I rode the subways, I saw people looking them over. To New York baseball fans they weren't just ads, and for a kid from Brooklyn, even just getting the opportunity to do that project made me feel like the luckiest man on the face of the earth.

Nike NY's Baseball State of Mind was an Outdoor Advertising Association of America Merit Awards Finalist.

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Yankee stadium was in its last year and the MLB decided to honor the house that Ruth built. So they threw one last All-Star game there. For Nike NY and Nike Baseball that was a big opportunity for them. They had tons of Yankees on their roster, and tons of Mets too. It was a veritable advertising subway series. And me, well, baseball isn't my sport, but I am a certified card-carrying New Yorker, and I love the shit out of this town. It was the shot I was looking for. They stuck me with some kid from Minnesota, this guy Luke. We were the greenest creatives in the agency, and we weren't supposed to get the campaign. But we did. 

For me, it was a long time coming, and for Luke, the city represented all kinds of promise. For us It was a love letter to NY. We strung together a campaign of entirely found images, including flickr shots, which at the time was unheard of. We took the roots of baseball and the nature of the city and we made something that people cared about. The campaign went everywhere. The papers, the subway, wildpostings, even Nike's 34th st. billboard.

I'll always remember this campaign fondly. Because we shouldn't have gotten it, but we did, and we took it someplace. When I rode the subways, I saw people looking them over. To New York baseball fans they weren't just ads, and for a kid from Brooklyn, even just getting the opportunity to do that project made me feel like the luckiest man on the face of the earth.

Nike NY's Baseball State of Mind was an Outdoor Advertising Association of America Merit Awards Finalist.

 

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Yankee stadium was in its last year and the MLB decided to honor the house that Ruth built. So they threw one last All-Star game there. For Nike NY and Nike Baseball that was a big opportunity for them. They had tons of Yankees on their roster, and tons of Mets too. It was a veritable advertising subway series. And me, well, baseball isn't my sport, but I am a certified card-carrying New Yorker, and I love the shit out of this town. It was the shot I was looking for. They stuck me with some kid from Minnesota, this guy Luke. We were the greenest creatives in the agency, and we weren't supposed to get the campaign. But we did. 

For me, it was a long time coming, and for Luke, the city represented all kinds of promise. For us It was a love letter to NY. We strung together a campaign of entirely found images, including flickr shots, which at the time was unheard of. We took the roots of baseball and the nature of the city and we made something that people cared about. The campaign went everywhere. The papers, the subway, wildpostings, even Nike's 34th st. billboard.

I'll always remember this campaign fondly. Because we shouldn't have gotten it, but we did, and we took it someplace. When I rode the subways, I saw people looking them over. To New York baseball fans they weren't just ads, and for a kid from Brooklyn, even just getting the opportunity to do that project made me feel like the luckiest man on the face of the earth.

Nike NY's Baseball State of Mind was an Outdoor Advertising Association of America Merit Awards Finalist.

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Yankee stadium was in its last year and the MLB decided to honor the house that Ruth built. So they threw one last All-Star game there. For Nike NY and Nike Baseball that was a big opportunity for them. They had tons of Yankees on their roster, and tons of Mets too. It was a veritable advertising subway series. And me, well, baseball isn't my sport, but I am a certified card-carrying New Yorker, and I love the shit out of this town. It was the shot I was looking for. They stuck me with some kid from Minnesota, this guy Luke. We were the greenest creatives in the agency, and we weren't supposed to get the campaign. But we did. 

For me, it was a long time coming, and for Luke, the city represented all kinds of promise. For us It was a love letter to NY. We strung together a campaign of entirely found images, including flickr shots, which at the time was unheard of. We took the roots of baseball and the nature of the city and we made something that people cared about. The campaign went everywhere. The papers, the subway, wildpostings, even Nike's 34th st. billboard.

I'll always remember this campaign fondly. Because we shouldn't have gotten it, but we did, and we took it someplace. When I rode the subways, I saw people looking them over. To New York baseball fans they weren't just ads, and for a kid from Brooklyn, even just getting the opportunity to do that project made me feel like the luckiest man on the face of the earth.

Nike NY's Baseball State of Mind was an Outdoor Advertising Association of America Merit Awards Finalist.

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Yankee stadium was in its last year and the MLB decided to honor the house that Ruth built. So they threw one last All-Star game there. For Nike NY and Nike Baseball that was a big opportunity for them. They had tons of Yankees on their roster, and tons of Mets too. It was a veritable advertising subway series. And me, well, baseball isn't my sport, but I am a certified card-carrying New Yorker, and I love the shit out of this town. It was the shot I was looking for. They stuck me with some kid from Minnesota, this guy Luke. We were the greenest creatives in the agency, and we weren't supposed to get the campaign. But we did. 

For me, it was a long time coming, and for Luke, the city represented all kinds of promise. For us It was a love letter to NY. We strung together a campaign of entirely found images, including flickr shots, which at the time was unheard of. We took the roots of baseball and the nature of the city and we made something that people cared about. The campaign went everywhere. The papers, the subway, wildpostings, even Nike's 34th st. billboard.

I'll always remember this campaign fondly. Because we shouldn't have gotten it, but we did, and we took it someplace. When I rode the subways, I saw people looking them over. To New York baseball fans they weren't just ads, and for a kid from Brooklyn, even just getting the opportunity to do that project made me feel like the luckiest man on the face of the earth.

Nike NY's Baseball State of Mind was an Outdoor Advertising Association of America Merit Awards Finalist.

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Yankee stadium was in its last year and the MLB decided to honor the house that Ruth built. So they threw one last All-Star game there. For Nike NY and Nike Baseball that was a big opportunity for them. They had tons of Yankees on their roster, and tons of Mets too. It was a veritable advertising subway series. And me, well, baseball isn't my sport, but I am a certified card-carrying New Yorker, and I love the shit out of this town. It was the shot I was looking for. They stuck me with some kid from Minnesota, this guy Luke. We were the greenest creatives in the agency, and we weren't supposed to get the campaign. But we did. 

For me, it was a long time coming, and for Luke, the city represented all kinds of promise. For us It was a love letter to NY. We strung together a campaign of entirely found images, including flickr shots, which at the time was unheard of. We took the roots of baseball and the nature of the city and we made something that people cared about. The campaign went everywhere. The papers, the subway, wildpostings, even Nike's 34th st. billboard.

I'll always remember this campaign fondly. Because we shouldn't have gotten it, but we did, and we took it someplace. When I rode the subways, I saw people looking them over. To New York baseball fans they weren't just ads, and for a kid from Brooklyn, even just getting the opportunity to do that project made me feel like the luckiest man on the face of the earth.

Nike NY's Baseball State of Mind was an Outdoor Advertising Association of America Merit Awards Finalist.

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Yankee stadium was in its last year and the MLB decided to honor the house that Ruth built. So they threw one last All-Star game there. For Nike NY and Nike Baseball that was a big opportunity for them. They had tons of Yankees on their roster, and tons of Mets too. It was a veritable advertising subway series. And me, well, baseball isn't my sport, but I am a certified card-carrying New Yorker, and I love the shit out of this town. It was the shot I was looking for. They stuck me with some kid from Minnesota, this guy Luke. We were the greenest creatives in the agency, and we weren't supposed to get the campaign. But we did. 

For me, it was a long time coming, and for Luke, the city represented all kinds of promise. For us It was a love letter to NY. We strung together a campaign of entirely found images, including flickr shots, which at the time was unheard of. We took the roots of baseball and the nature of the city and we made something that people cared about. The campaign went everywhere. The papers, the subway, wildpostings, even Nike's 34th st. billboard.

I'll always remember this campaign fondly. Because we shouldn't have gotten it, but we did, and we took it someplace. When I rode the subways, I saw people looking them over. To New York baseball fans they weren't just ads, and for a kid from Brooklyn, even just getting the opportunity to do that project made me feel like the luckiest man on the face of the earth.

Nike NY's Baseball State of Mind was an Outdoor Advertising Association of America Merit Awards Finalist.

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Yankee stadium was in its last year and the MLB decided to honor the house that Ruth built. So they threw one last All-Star game there. For Nike NY and Nike Baseball that was a big opportunity for them. They had tons of Yankees on their roster, and tons of Mets too. It was a veritable advertising subway series. And me, well, baseball isn't my sport, but I am a certified card-carrying New Yorker, and I love the shit out of this town. It was the shot I was looking for. They stuck me with some kid from Minnesota, this guy Luke. We were the greenest creatives in the agency, and we weren't supposed to get the campaign. But we did. 

For me, it was a long time coming, and for Luke, the city represented all kinds of promise. For us It was a love letter to NY. We strung together a campaign of entirely found images, including flickr shots, which at the time was unheard of. We took the roots of baseball and the nature of the city and we made something that people cared about. The campaign went everywhere. The papers, the subway, wildpostings, even Nike's 34th st. billboard.

I'll always remember this campaign fondly. Because we shouldn't have gotten it, but we did, and we took it someplace. When I rode the subways, I saw people looking them over. To New York baseball fans they weren't just ads, and for a kid from Brooklyn, even just getting the opportunity to do that project made me feel like the luckiest man on the face of the earth.

Nike NY's Baseball State of Mind was an Outdoor Advertising Association of America Merit Awards Finalist.

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Yankee stadium was in its last year and the MLB decided to honor the house that Ruth built. So they threw one last All-Star game there. For Nike NY and Nike Baseball that was a big opportunity for them. They had tons of Yankees on their roster, and tons of Mets too. It was a veritable advertising subway series. And me, well, baseball isn't my sport, but I am a certified card-carrying New Yorker, and I love the shit out of this town. It was the shot I was looking for. They stuck me with some kid from Minnesota, this guy Luke. We were the greenest creatives in the agency, and we weren't supposed to get the campaign. But we did. 

For me, it was a long time coming, and for Luke, the city represented all kinds of promise. For us It was a love letter to NY. We strung together a campaign of entirely found images, including flickr shots, which at the time was unheard of. We took the roots of baseball and the nature of the city and we made something that people cared about. The campaign went everywhere. The papers, the subway, wildpostings, even Nike's 34th st. billboard.

I'll always remember this campaign fondly. Because we shouldn't have gotten it, but we did, and we took it someplace. When I rode the subways, I saw people looking them over. To New York baseball fans they weren't just ads, and for a kid from Brooklyn, even just getting the opportunity to do that project made me feel like the luckiest man on the face of the earth.

Nike NY's Baseball State of Mind was an Outdoor Advertising Association of America Merit Awards Finalist.

 Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Yankee stadium was in its last year and the MLB decided to honor the house that Ruth built. So they threw one last All-Star game there. For Nike NY and Nike Baseball that was a big opportunity for them. They had tons of Yankees on their roster, and tons of Mets too. It was a veritable advertising subway series. And me, well, baseball isn't my sport, but I am a certified card-carrying New Yorker, and I love the shit out of this town. It was the shot I was looking for. They stuck me with some kid from Minnesota, this guy Luke. We were the greenest creatives in the agency, and we weren't supposed to get the campaign. But we did. 

For me, it was a long time coming, and for Luke, the city represented all kinds of promise. For us It was a love letter to NY. We strung together a campaign of entirely found images, including flickr shots, which at the time was unheard of. We took the roots of baseball and the nature of the city and we made something that people cared about. The campaign went everywhere. The papers, the subway, wildpostings, even Nike's 34th st. billboard.

I'll always remember this campaign fondly. Because we shouldn't have gotten it, but we did, and we took it someplace. When I rode the subways, I saw people looking them over. To New York baseball fans they weren't just ads, and for a kid from Brooklyn, even just getting the opportunity to do that project made me feel like the luckiest man on the face of the earth.

Nike NY's Baseball State of Mind was an Outdoor Advertising Association of America Merit Awards Finalist.

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Yankee stadium was in its last year and the MLB decided to honor the house that Ruth built. So they threw one last All-Star game there. For Nike NY and Nike Baseball that was a big opportunity for them. They had tons of Yankees on their roster, and tons of Mets too. It was a veritable advertising subway series. And me, well, baseball isn't my sport, but I am a certified card-carrying New Yorker, and I love the shit out of this town. It was the shot I was looking for. They stuck me with some kid from Minnesota, this guy Luke. We were the greenest creatives in the agency, and we weren't supposed to get the campaign. But we did. 

For me, it was a long time coming, and for Luke, the city represented all kinds of promise. For us It was a love letter to NY. We strung together a campaign of entirely found images, including flickr shots, which at the time was unheard of. We took the roots of baseball and the nature of the city and we made something that people cared about. The campaign went everywhere. The papers, the subway, wildpostings, even Nike's 34th st. billboard.

I'll always remember this campaign fondly. Because we shouldn't have gotten it, but we did, and we took it someplace. When I rode the subways, I saw people looking them over. To New York baseball fans they weren't just ads, and for a kid from Brooklyn, even just getting the opportunity to do that project made me feel like the luckiest man on the face of the earth.

Nike NY's Baseball State of Mind was an Outdoor Advertising Association of America Merit Awards Finalist.

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Nike NY Baseball State of Mind

Yankee stadium was in its last year and the MLB decided to honor the house that Ruth built. So they threw one last All-Star game there. For Nike NY and Nike Baseball that was a big opportunity for them. They had tons of Yankees on their roster, and tons of Mets too. It was a veritable advertising subway series. And me, well, baseball isn't my sport, but I am a certified card-carrying New Yorker, and I love the shit out of this town. It was the shot I was looking for. They stuck me with some kid from Minnesota, this guy Luke. We were the greenest creatives in the agency, and we weren't supposed to get the campaign. But we did. 

For me, it was a long time coming, and for Luke, the city represented all kinds of promise. For us It was a love letter to NY. We strung together a campaign of entirely found images, including flickr shots, which at the time was unheard of. We took the roots of baseball and the nature of the city and we made something that people cared about. The campaign went everywhere. The papers, the subway, wildpostings, even Nike's 34th st. billboard.

I'll always remember this campaign fondly. Because we shouldn't have gotten it, but we did, and we took it someplace. When I rode the subways, I saw people looking them over. To New York baseball fans they weren't just ads, and for a kid from Brooklyn, even just getting the opportunity to do that project made me feel like the luckiest man on the face of the earth.

Nike NY's Baseball State of Mind was an Outdoor Advertising Association of America Merit Awards Finalist.

Jordan Brand: Dwyane Wade Zipcodes

Jordan Brand: Dwyane Wade Zipcodes

One of the things that happens when you start working on Brand Jordan is facing their roster and the questions that fall out of it. Questions like: what in the hot hell do any of these people have in common? It's not basketball--they have football players, baseball players, boxers, and a runner with no shins. It's not skill--nearly the entire roster is guys you've never heard of, and several of them are full-on retired. So when we were asked to create a multi-year apparel campaign with their guys, we were struggling not to make "random shit" the creative thread. 

Fortunately for us (and readers of urban magazines everywhere), there actually is one thing that all their top guys have in common: They all founded charities in the neighborhoods they grew up in. While it's true that a lot of celebrities have their own charities, it means something when you're from baltimore, or the south side, or salem NC, or north philly and you come back. 

We wanted to show of the clothes sure, but we also wanted to dimensionalize our athletes, tell their stories, and help them bring attention to their communities. To these guys zipcodes meant something. As much as it meant to the people who still lived there.

For me this will always be one of my favorite campaigns because I got to meet NBA stars and see them in their true environment. I saw Melo telling a plucky kid from his neighborhood that he was in fact 'better than Kobe'. I watched DWade's mom feed him waffles in the place he ate his first waffle. Rip Hamilton knew every kid in his neighborhood by name, putting his little nephew in front frame right next to him. It was very special for me. 

 

Jordan Brand: Carmelo Anthony ZIpcodes

Jordan Brand: Carmelo Anthony ZIpcodes

One of the things that happens when you start working on Brand Jordan is facing their roster and the questions that fall out of it. Questions like: what in the hot hell do any of these people have in common? It's not basketball--they have football players, baseball players, boxers, and a runner with no shins. It's not skill--nearly the entire roster is guys you've never heard of, and several of them are full-on retired. So when we were asked to create a multi-year apparel campaign with their guys, we were struggling not to make "random shit" the creative thread. 

Fortunately for us (and readers of urban magazines everywhere), there actually is one thing that all their top guys have in common: They all founded charities in the neighborhoods they grew up in. While it's true that a lot of celebrities have their own charities, it means something when you're from baltimore, or the south side, or salem NC, or north philly and you come back. 

We wanted to show of the clothes sure, but we also wanted to dimensionalize our athletes, tell their stories, and help them bring attention to their communities. To these guys zipcodes meant something. As much as it meant to the people who still lived there.

For me this will always be one of my favorite campaigns because I got to meet NBA stars and see them in their true environment. I saw Melo telling a plucky kid from his neighborhood that he was in fact 'better than Kobe'. I watched DWade's mom feed him waffles in the place he ate his first waffle. Rip Hamilton knew every kid in his neighborhood by name, putting his little nephew in front frame right next to him. It was very special for me. 

 

ESPN 'Cause It's Racing Print

ESPN 'Cause It's Racing Print

The reason people love or hate NASCAR is actually almost zen in its abstract absurdity. Ask someone why they hate it--or ask someone why they love it--and they'll all say the same thing: "Because. That's why." 

We took that sentiment and that pride and created a character to speak through: OId Man NASCAR. Old Man NASCAR is a racer from back in the day. A man who's seen it all, a man who just might tell you about it if you ask. A man who like you, loves NASCAR for a simple reason: 'Cause it's Racing. 

We took that voice and we shaped it into type that threw hooks, uppercuts, and a mean cross. We parted smoke to leave the figure of heroes, like Sergio Leone did. We took old italian racing posters and made 'em something Americans could look at. Crumpled 'em up and unrolled em so that if you came across one, well, you'd want to keep it. 

The 'Cause it's Racing Campaign was recognized by the ADC Young Guns 9 Awards

Ghetto Film School

Ghetto Film School

When Weiden asked that Attack take a look at creating the Ghetto Film School's visual identity, I was happily surprised to find an organization that really challenged kids to rise to real-life standards. 

The GFS gives a small group of teens 4 years to write, develop, produce, edit, and premiere a film of their own creation. They're given a real budget (generally 40k a film in investment), real tools, and are expected to create a quality product. There are very real expectations, very real financial risk , and real trust. Every year the GFS releases films that rival and often eclipse the senior projects of major film programs nationwide. They focus on the basics, and they get great results.

We were inspired by how the GFS process started simple to become something much bigger. So we created a logo, typeface, and overall graphic identity inspired by one of the most humble building blocks of film: Gaffer's tape.

The Ghetto Film School Identity Design was recognized by the ADC Young Guns 9 Awards.

Ghetto Film School

Ghetto Film School

When Weiden asked that Attack take a look at creating the Ghetto Film School's visual identity, I was happily surprised to find an organization that really challenged kids to rise to real-life standards. 

The GFS gives a small group of teens 4 years to write, develop, produce, edit, and premiere a film of their own creation. They're given a real budget (generally 40k a film in investment), real tools, and are expected to create a quality product. There are very real expectations, very real financial risk , and real trust. Every year the GFS releases films that rival and often eclipse the senior projects of major film programs nationwide. They focus on the basics, and they get great results.

We were inspired by how the GFS process started simple to become something much bigger. So we created a logo, typeface, and overall graphic identity inspired by one of the most humble building blocks of film: Gaffer's tape.

The Ghetto Film School Identity Design was recognized by the ADC Young Guns 9 Awards.

Silver Lining Opticians

Silver Lining Opticians

Silver Lining is a name that many a stylist knows well. They're the place to go when looking for impeccable, mint deadstock eyewear. For that, these guys are kind of the best and only answer in town. 

They had an existing cloud logo, and wanted us to incorporate some of it into our new designs. On top of that, they gave us a classic design challenge: They wanted their logo to translate into a monogram, without any change in letterform. If you've ever tried this it's pretty difficult, add all the normal constraints of style and message, and it can get downright ugly. But it didn't. In fact, it got downright beautiful. 

The Silver Lining Identity Design was recognized by the ADC Young Guns 9 Awards

Silver Lining Opticians

Silver Lining Opticians

Silver Lining is a name that many a stylist knows well. They're the place to go when looking for impeccable, mint deadstock eyewear. For that, these guys are kind of the best and only answer in town. 

They had an existing cloud logo, and wanted us to incorporate some of it into our new designs. On top of that, they gave us a classic design challenge: They wanted their logo to translate into a monogram, without any change in letterform. If you've ever tried this it's pretty difficult, add all the normal constraints of style and message, and it can get downright ugly. But it didn't. In fact, it got downright beautiful. 

The Silver Lining Identity Design was recognized by the ADC Young Guns 9 Awards

Silver Lining Opticians

Silver Lining Opticians

Silver Lining is a name that many a stylist knows well. They're the place to go when looking for impeccable, mint deadstock eyewear. For that, these guys are kind of the best and only answer in town. 

They had an existing cloud logo, and wanted us to incorporate some of it into our new designs. On top of that, they gave us a classic design challenge: They wanted their logo to translate into a monogram, without any change in letterform. If you've ever tried this it's pretty difficult, add all the normal constraints of style and message, and it can get downright ugly. But it didn't. In fact, it got downright beautiful. 

The Silver Lining Identity Design was recognized by the ADC Young Guns 9 Awards

Day Trip Magazine

Day Trip Magazine

When Attack was still brand-new and we didn't have anything in particular going on, we decided to hit the town and reach out to various creative types around the city. We where all over the place. We met so many people with so much great work that we decided to chronicle our travels, our day trips. In the beginning, we wanted only to show a creator's work, matched with a unique typographic design of their name. It was about as pure as a culture mag can get--no editorial, no opinion, just work. 

In the end our day trips ended up hooking us up with nearly all of our independent clients. It became a small social circle of movers and shakers of all sorts. It was connected to pretty much everything, and it was probably some of the most fun shit we did together. 

Day Trip was recognized by the ADC Young Guns 9 Awards.

Day Trip Magazine

Day Trip Magazine

When Attack was still brand-new and we didn't have anything in particular going on, we decided to hit the town and reach out to various creative types around the city. We where all over the place. We met so many people with so much great work that we decided to chronicle our travels, our day trips. In the beginning, we wanted only to show a creator's work, matched with a unique typographic design of their name. It was about as pure as a culture mag can get--no editorial, no opinion, just work. 

In the end our day trips ended up hooking us up with nearly all of our independent clients. It became a small social circle of movers and shakers of all sorts. It was connected to pretty much everything, and it was probably some of the most fun shit we did together. 

Day Trip was recognized by the ADC Young Guns 9 Awards.

The Cinema School

The Cinema School

Joe Hall, the founder of the Ghetto Film School, was so happy with the work we had done for him that he asked us to take a look at branding his newest project, the first-ever film-studies high school in NYC: The Cinema School. The Cinema School is a magnet school, like the Laguardias and Stuyvessants of the city. Unlike those schools, the Cinema School was only just starting and thus needed to impart the feeling of prestige that some of the more established schools had, without any snootiness or antiquity. 

In the same manner as the GFS project, we looked at the core of school: filmmaking. Using Edweard Muybridge's famous The Horse in Motion, we combined classic crest-style family marks with more stereotypical letter jacket-style high school lettering, adding muybridge's horse as a simple reminder of the focus of the school. Combining these elements, we took special care too appear prestigious, but not stuffy.

The Cinema School

The Cinema School

Joe Hall, the founder of the Ghetto Film School, was so happy with the work we had done for him that he asked us to take a look at branding his newest project, the first-ever film-studies high school in NYC: The Cinema School. The Cinema School is a magnet school, like the Laguardias and Stuyvessants of the city. Unlike those schools, the Cinema School was only just starting and thus needed to impart the feeling of prestige that some of the more established schools had, without any snootiness or antiquity. 

In the same manner as the GFS project, we looked at the core of school: filmmaking. Using Edweard Muybridge's famous The Horse in Motion, we combined classic crest-style family marks with more stereotypical letter jacket-style high school lettering, adding muybridge's horse as a simple reminder of the focus of the school. Combining these elements, we took special care too appear prestigious, but not stuffy.

Captain Morgan: To Life, Love, & Loot

Captain Morgan: To Life, Love, & Loot

y first job at Anomaly was for Captain Morgan. It was a pitch and they needed an art direction that would signify a change in the brand, something refined, but still very piratey. It needed to be something that could continue the brand's story of Captain James Henry Morgan, something that highlighted the toast: "To Life, Love and Loot". 

There's a sort of drunken revelry quality to the lockups that's kind of nice. It's fun to actually read. Like a ship run aground in a storm of rum-soaked cola.

Captain Morgan: To Life, Love & Loot

Captain Morgan: To Life, Love & Loot

y first job at Anomaly was for Captain Morgan. It was a pitch and they needed an art direction that would signify a change in the brand, something refined, but still very piratey. It needed to be something that could continue the brand's story of Captain James Henry Morgan, something that highlighted the toast: "To Life, Love and Loot". 

There's a sort of drunken revelry quality to the lockups that's kind of nice. It's fun to actually read. Like a ship run aground in a storm of rum-soaked cola.

ISA ORA 2010 W Lookbook

ISA ORA 2010 W Lookbook

Following the success of the ISAORA Launch Video, ISAORA asked us do their lookbook. It was fun. We shot at Milk, we booked the brilliant Karolin Wolters and the enigmatic Randy LeBeau, so thinks were at wonderful and even a bit...magical. 

And by magical I mean that randy is also a magician, brought a set of cards to the set, and proceeded to entertain us with an array of cool tricks. Marc, the owner of ISAORA, became obsessed and insisted on practicing in-between ensembles. Being a novice at the time, there were playing cards everywhere. It was laid back. We all worked together, and in the end we got some beautiful stuff. I wish all clients were that cool.

The ISAORA F/W 2010 Lookbook was recognized by the ADC Young Guns 9 Awards.

ISA ORA 2010 W Lookbook

ISA ORA 2010 W Lookbook

Following the success of the ISAORA Launch Video, ISAORA asked us do their lookbook. It was fun. We shot at Milk, we booked the brilliant Karolin Wolters and the enigmatic Randy LeBeau, so thinks were at wonderful and even a bit...magical. 

And by magical I mean that randy is also a magician, brought a set of cards to the set, and proceeded to entertain us with an array of cool tricks. Marc, the owner of ISAORA, became obsessed and insisted on practicing in-between ensembles. Being a novice at the time, there were playing cards everywhere. It was laid back. We all worked together, and in the end we got some beautiful stuff. I wish all clients were that cool.

The ISAORA F/W 2010 Lookbook was recognized by the ADC Young Guns 9 Awards.