Tide Superbowl: Miracle Stain

Tide wanted to be #1 in the Superbowl. So we wrote a great Supwer Bowl spot. But to push it over the edge, we decided it would feature the final two Super Bowl teams as part of the story, something no one had done before. 

What that meant was we had to shoot 2 weeks before the Super Bowl and cover basically 4 different versions of the spot. So that's what we did. We shot, edited, added post, mixed--all in like 5 days--with the sort of awesome curveball of doing it all over with only 3 days left.

3 days before the Super Bowl, we convinced Tide to run it as a 60 instead of a 30. This meant last-minute media scramble and an increased spend of $8 million more. It aired, and we watched it anxiously. The next day USA today named it the #2 ad of the Super Bowl. Later on we would find that the #1 spot only beat us by 0.01% of the vote. We demanded a recount, but no one wanted to so...all in all, quite a ride. 

Miracle Stain was recognized by the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity, and was awarded Bronze.

"Anthem" :60 Food as it should be, Panera

In a time of unparalleled understanding of food, Americans are more confused and afraid than they ever have been. Regardless of region or culture, Americans feel guilt about the food they eat, or worse--have given up on eating nutritiously, believing falsely that food either is tastes good and is bad for you, or that it tastes bad because its healthy.

Well, that's not how food should be. 

While everyone else sells the cheesiest, baconiest, $4.99iest product on a blank background, we wanted to sell good eating. Eating that nourishes you in more ways than the one. The emotion in eating. The culture of food that we have started to forget. Food at a table, with people you care about, that does your body good. Food as it should be.

"Anthem" was awarded Ad of the Day by Adweek, June 15, 2015.

Invincible :60 NASCAR on ESPN 'Cause It's Racing

In all honesty when I got put on this project I was a bit at a loss. I'm a kid from Brooklyn. What the hell do I know about NASCAR? But a wise man once said: "Always take the factory tour." So, for research, I went with the rest of Attack to a race. 

Being at the race and meeting all the people and seeing the infield (where everyone camps out) made us realize that the reason people love or hate NASCAR is actually almost zen in its abstract absurdity. Ask someone why they hate it--or ask someone why they love it--and they'll all say the same thing: "Because. That's why." 

We took that sentiment and that pride and created a character to speak through: OId Man NASCAR. Old Man NASCAR is a racer from back in the day. A man who's seen it all, a man who just might tell you about it if you ask. A man who like you, loves NASCAR for a simple reason: 'Cause it's Racing. 

The 'Cause it's Racing Campaign was recognized by the ADC Young Guns 9 Awards

 

Obsession ESPN 'Cause It's Racing

In all honesty when I got put on this project I was a bit at a loss. I'm a kid from Brooklyn. What the hell do I know about NASCAR? But a wise man once said: "Always take the factory tour." So, for research, I went with the rest of Attack to a race. 

Being at the race and meeting all the people and seeing the infield (where everyone camps out) made us realize that the reason people love or hate NASCAR is actually almost zen in its abstract absurdity. Ask someone why they hate it--or ask someone why they love it--and they'll all say the same thing: "Because. That's why." 

We took that sentiment and that pride and created a character to speak through: OId Man NASCAR. Old Man NASCAR is a racer from back in the day. A man who's seen it all, a man who just might tell you about it if you ask. A man who like you, loves NASCAR for a simple reason: 'Cause it's Racing. 

The 'Cause it's Racing Campaign was recognized by the ADC Young Guns 9 Awards

No Endings :30 NASCAR on ESPN 'Cause It's Racing

In all honesty when I got put on this project I was a bit at a loss. I'm a kid from Brooklyn. What the hell do I know about NASCAR? But a wise man once said: "Always take the factory tour." So, for research, I went with the rest of Attack to a race. 

Being at the race and meeting all the people and seeing the infield (where everyone camps out) made us realize that the reason people love or hate NASCAR is actually almost zen in its abstract absurdity. Ask someone why they hate it--or ask someone why they love it--and they'll all say the same thing: "Because. That's why." 

We took that sentiment and that pride and created a character to speak through: OId Man NASCAR. Old Man NASCAR is a racer from back in the day. A man who's seen it all, a man who just might tell you about it if you ask. A man who like you, loves NASCAR for a simple reason: 'Cause it's Racing. 

The 'Cause it's Racing Campaign was recognized by the ADC Young Guns 9 Awards

 

"Devour" :15 Food as it should be, Panera

 

While everyone else sells the cheesiest, baconiest, $4.99iest product on a blank background, we wanted to sell good eating. Eating that nourishes you in more ways than the one. The emotion in eating. The culture of food that we have started to forget. Food at a table, with people you care about, that does your body good. Food as it should be.

So, that's what we did. Rather than run ad ad about how much salad was in our salad, or how creamy our ranch is, we ran celebrations of eating. Because eating is fun, and it's good for you. Sometimes it's easy to forget that.

"Anthem" was awarded Ad of the Day by Adweek, June 15, 2015.

"Sweetness" :15 Food as it should be, Panera

While everyone else sells the cheesiest, baconiest, $4.99iest product on a blank background, we wanted to sell good eating. Eating that nourishes you in more ways than the one. The emotion in eating. The culture of food that we have started to forget. Food at a table, with people you care about, that does your body good. Food as it should be.

So, that's what we did. Rather than run ad ad about how much salad was in our salad, or how creamy our ranch is, we ran celebrations of eating. Because eating is fun, and it's good for you. Sometimes it's easy to forget that.

"Anthem" was awarded Ad of the Day by Adweek, June 15, 2015.

ISAORA Launch Video

The ISAORA guys needed a video for their launch party, and they needed it in 48 hours. Projects like that can be great because they allow you to posit ideas like: What if we just threw the jackets around and shot it on a phantom? I this case, that pitch sold, and the result was fantastic. 

Simple projects like this are doubly great because they let everyone involved just do what they do. Shinichi Maruyama liked the project. So did MNDR. And Jamie Carreiro. All in all, it was kind of a perfect storm. I love how simple this project was, and how great it came out.

We got tons of play on Hypebeast.com, Fffound.com, and one of my personal favorites, Dethjunkie.com. 

Budweiser World Cup Hype :30

Hype is the story of a Superbowl spot too hot for the client, but beloved by the agency. It was created to run in the 2014 Super Bowl, but was cut at the last minute--too much of a a rah-rah America thing for no real reason. At this point I would like to mention that our head client on Bud was a Brit, his boss was a Belgian, and his boss' boss was Brazilian. For many at ABI it was too random, too macho. And for those reasons, it died.

But some of us at the agency--most notably Luke Behrends and I--never gave up on Hype...just like every American at the end of every movie ever. A couple months later, the US was doing well in the World Cup and USA fervor was at and all time high going into July 4th. This was Hype's perfect scenario. Luke and I quickly cut in team USA highlights and at the highest point in USA World Cup fervor, HYPE ran on ESPN before the deciding USA vs. Belgium game. 

Experience the New York Times: Invention

I walk into the New York Times. The hallway in the lobby is hung with a million small screens, changing constantly, clicking away like a typing pool.  I take the elevator to the 44th floor. Up here I can see the entire city. Traffic is backed up on 30-somethingth street. 

I meet with Nathaniel Whitten, a guy who ran his own ad shop for 10 years, with more than 20 years in the game. It becomes clear that I'm less interviewing for a job and more to see if I can be his partner. Nat reminds me of the NBA coach Phil Jackson: A jumble of untouchable experience, true, pure creative brilliance, and a zen philosophy barely keeping his passions in check. I can tell I'm the latest of a long line of partners that couldn't match up? with him? Luckily for both of us, I've spent my life in New York and he's the latest in a long line of very intense people I've met. I kinda get him. 

So of course, it turns out we work well together. He likes how I fight, I like how he fights, and our Account Director Kevin Nabipour keeps it all working smoothly. It's a nice balance and our personalities fortuitously epitomize the campaign: We often debate music, art, and politics at length in the middle of reviews. We cite sources in our arguments, we revel in each new dimension added to a story. We take our debates and we think about what it means to truly understand a story. We create a campaign about dialogue, opinion, truth and every element that people look for when the abridged version of "news" won't cut it.

Experience the New York Times: Creativity

I walk into the New York Times. The hallway in the lobby is hung with a million small screens, changing constantly, clicking away like a typing pool.  I take the elevator to the 44th floor. Up here I can see the entire city. Traffic is backed up on 30-somethingth street. 

I meet with Nathaniel Whitten, a guy who ran his own ad shop for 10 years, with more than 20 years in the game. It becomes clear that I'm less interviewing for a job and more to see if I can be his partner. Nat reminds me of the NBA coach Phil Jackson: A jumble of untouchable experience, true, pure creative brilliance, and a zen philosophy barely keeping his passions in check. I can tell I'm the latest of a long line of partners that couldn't match up? with him? Luckily for both of us, I've spent my life in New York and he's the latest in a long line of very intense people I've met. I kinda get him. 

So of course, it turns out we work well together. He likes how I fight, I like how he fights, and our Account Director Kevin Nabipour keeps it all working smoothly. It's a nice balance and our personalities fortuitously epitomize the campaign: We often debate music, art, and politics at length in the middle of reviews. We cite sources in our arguments, we revel in each new dimension added to a story. We take our debates and we think about what it means to truly understand a story. We create a campaign about dialogue, opinion, truth and every element that people look for when the abridged version of "news" won't cut it.

Experience the New York Times: Relationships

I walk into the New York Times. The hallway in the lobby is hung with a million small screens, changing constantly, clicking away like a typing pool.  I take the elevator to the 44th floor. Up here I can see the entire city. Traffic is backed up on 30-somethingth street. 

I meet with Nathaniel Whitten, a guy who ran his own ad shop for 10 years, with more than 20 years in the game. It becomes clear that I'm less interviewing for a job and more to see if I can be his partner. Nat reminds me of the NBA coach Phil Jackson: A jumble of untouchable experience, true, pure creative brilliance, and a zen philosophy barely keeping his passions in check. I can tell I'm the latest of a long line of partners that couldn't match up? with him? Luckily for both of us, I've spent my life in New York and he's the latest in a long line of very intense people I've met. I kinda get him. 

So of course, it turns out we work well together. He likes how I fight, I like how he fights, and our Account Director Kevin Nabipour keeps it all working smoothly. It's a nice balance and our personalities fortuitously epitomize the campaign: We often debate music, art, and politics at length in the middle of reviews. We cite sources in our arguments, we revel in each new dimension added to a story. We take our debates and we think about what it means to truly understand a story. We create a campaign about dialogue, opinion, truth and every element that people look for when the abridged version of "news" won't cut it.